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280 Kane St. STE #2
South Williamsport, PA
United States

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Latest Issue


Spring 2022 Nail Colors

There’s nothing like a freshly painted manicure or pedicure to rejuvenate the season, your outfit, and your mood. Now, as you’re packing up your winter coats and boots, it is a good time to look into transitioning your nail color for spring! When considering warm-weather nail polish, bright shades like orange, red, and pink will

There’s nothing like a freshly painted manicure or pedicure to rejuvenate the season, your outfit, and your mood. Now, as you’re packing up your winter coats and boots, it is a good time to look into transitioning your nail color for spring! When considering warm-weather nail polish, bright shades like orange, red, and pink will always be popular. But, picking a color can also be more intuitive, like grabbing a shade you’re gravitating to in the moment. Or you may take a more mindful approach thinking about the impact color can have on your emotions. Needless to say, selecting one color amidst so many options can be overwhelming. Here’s a rundown of some trending shades and what they may signify to you.

True classics never go out of style, so no matter the season, why not dare to wear red on your fingers and your toes? Pops of red can make you feel joyful, as red signifies action and movement. Feeling a bit down? Then go for that red pedicure to perk up. Red works great for travel, special occasions, or any time you want to feel bold.

If, instead of boosting, you need soothing, then turn to the caring nature of a sheer polish. Clean, minimal, barely-there pearly colors can calm and relax your mood while also refreshing your nail game after a winter of darker shades. Pink is also a caring color that reminds you to be kind to yourself and to take care of yourself. If you’re seeking balance from some of life’s current chaos, then go for a severely minimal vibe with a nude or skin-toned polish.

Ready to be a bit bold? Let go of the notion that green nails are only for the fall or the holidays. This season, experiment with forest green, mint green, and even some green metallics for an empowering mani-pedi. To stay on top of green nails, swap out the color every two weeks to keep things fresh and to avoid staining the nail. And don’t be surprised if friends and loved ones go green with envy when they see your bright and fresh digits.

Another creative color option is purple. It gives off a bit of drama while complimenting most, if not all, springtime looks. Lavender and periwinkle are the obvious shades for this time of year, but if you want to lean into the artistic nature of this palette, go for magenta. A deep purple can feel more adventurous and playful. Pedicures in this shade will have you literally walking on the wild side.

Not necessarily feeling up for bold or creative nails? Then consider blue. Normally, when I think of blue, I think of navy or a deep rich metallic blue, but for spring, turn down the intensity with a forget-me-knot or sky blue. Or go for an ocean blue to bring about a beachy, relaxed feeling. The lighter the blue, the more calming the effect.

Lastly, there’s the family of citrus tones. Peach, orange, and yellow all share an understated confidence. Softer than traditional beige, Peach can act as a warmer neutral for a quietly chic nail color. Orange is a bit more intense but still not overpowering. An orange pedi or mani makes for a fun but not over-the-top color. A pastel yellow, as opposed to a big, vibrant yellow, will deliver the epitome of mellow for your spring nails.

Sandal season is on the horizon, but we’re not quite there yet. In April, take some time to experiment and try out any of the above nail colors. Pedicures, in particular, are the perfect way to audition a color you may not have thought to try before. And don’t be afraid to mix and match. What works on the fingers may read as too mild on the toes, and vice versa.