About Webb Weekly

Webb Weekly is a family-oriented newspaper direct mailed to over 58,000 homes each week.

Webb Weekly

280 Kane St. STE #2
South Williamsport, PA
United States

Phone & Fax

Phone: 570-326-9322
Fax: 570-326-9383

Get In Touch With Us

Latest Issue


County Hall Corner: Attention – Who is Knocking at My Door?

The upcoming primary election on May 17th and the general election on November 8th promises to bring a host of visitors to come knocking on our doors. There will be those with petitions to get themselves on the ballot, those who are on the ballot and want your vote, and those plugging for these candidates.

The upcoming primary election on May 17th and the general election on November 8th promises to bring a host of visitors to come knocking on our doors. There will be those with petitions to get themselves on the ballot, those who are on the ballot and want your vote, and those plugging for these candidates.

But given that in the past couple of years, we have seen everything possible go supercalifragilistically weird, it is not surprising that there is the occasional wolf in sheep clothing among our friendly neighborhood door knockers. Lycoming County’s Department of Voter Services has reported that there have been reports of at least one individual who came to a home and claimed to be an employee of the county’s Voter Services Department and was seeking to solicit personal information.

Director Forrest Lehman attended the Lycoming County Commissioners Meeting on Tuesday, January 11th, to emphasize publicly that his department does NOT go door to door. If anyone is soliciting in the name of the department, they should report this immediately (voterservices@lyco.org or 570-327-2267).

However, these imposters should not deter residents from participating in the electoral process that comes to their doorsteps. The honest-to-goodness individuals who go door-to-door are very committed to their cause and deserve a few minutes of your time. These would be actual candidates and those who are canvassing for candidates who want to hear and be heard. It is an age-old tradition, and it should not be scorned because of the very few who seek to use underhanded tactics.

Generally, candidates or their party supporters try to campaign at large gatherings such as the Lycoming County Fair, the Builders Show, and other events that draw a good crowd. This is the best way to meet the most people in the shortest period of time. Yet, in my years of working with elected officials from the local to the national level, I have heard many, many times how valuable it is to get an ear-to-the-ground perspective of the constituents by going out into the community. Meeting regular people in their own neighborhoods is the best way to get the public pulse without filters.

So, with a little caution and prudence, be willing to answer that doorbell. If a candidate or candidate’s rep shows up at your doorstep, they should immediately identify themselves and explain why they are there. Always be very suspicious when individuals introduce their organization or party and not themselves. Be especially suspicious if they open with a question. For example, “Hello, I am with the Star-Spangled Banner Party, and are you the head of the home?” This might seem quite innocent, but it is a psychological way of controlling a conversation. Once you answer their question, you are the listener and responder. Psychologically it becomes harder to cut them off with the more questions you answer.

Be suspicious of those who use an old salesman trick known as the ‘survey’ approach. An innocent question is asked to establish rapport. Imagine a person who comes to the door and says they are taking a survey on Second Amendment rights. A gun owner would jump at the opportunity to give that a hearty thumbs-up. By an amazing coincidence, the surveyor just happens to represent Senator Soandso, who is a big Second Amendment supporter. The opposite is also possible. For those who say they believe in gun-control laws, the surveyor has material that shows his candidate has similar concerns. This is a bait-and-switch tactic that salespeople use, but not by honest political campaigns.

Properly, a candidate or candidate rep introduces themselves and explains why they are there. At this point, you have the right to say ‘sorry, not interested’ and bid them on their way. But if you are willing to sacrifice two or three minutes, it will be valuable for both you and the candidate or candidate’s representative. A standard question is to ask what are your greatest concerns. There are no bad answers, even if the issue has to do with a national issue like inflation or illegal immigration. The candidate or candidate rep may have no control in this area, but they can pass it on. If you are asked a specific question, be honest if you have no opinion or awareness of the issue. Your ignorance is also informative.

Be aware of the rogues out there, but please, don’t chase these folks away without listening first. We still live in a democracy, and every voice is important and should be heard.