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280 Kane St. STE #2
South Williamsport, PA
United States

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Fishing Opportunities

Happy New Year, kids. Trust all is well. Yes. I have been extremely busy of late. The basketball season is in full throttle. While the SJNRA Golden Knights are usually the topic of discussion. A few have asked if I am still fishing. Absolutely. I am not going to lie. I would rather talk about

Happy New Year, kids. Trust all is well. Yes. I have been extremely busy of late. The basketball season is in full throttle. While the SJNRA Golden Knights are usually the topic of discussion. A few have asked if I am still fishing. Absolutely. I am not going to lie. I would rather talk about nymphing than entertain questions on why I don’t play a zone defense.

Yes. My excursions are somewhat limited, but I did get a chance to throw a few casts over the holidays. Believe it or not, this is my favorite time of year to head out. Usually, I am the only guy on the water, but I will occasionally run into a few of my chums. I spent a good three hours on Wednesday in the brisk elements. The fish were a tad sluggish, and I only managed to land one. It was a great afternoon. I took a few photos and recorded some footage. I am finishing up my introductory videos. “The Lycoming Creek Chronicles” are about to go live as I might have landed my first major sponsor. But I still have not heard from the County or the Visitor’s Bureau. Maybe I should write them two letters a week. I mean, they can’t ignore me forever.

Several bugs are still hatching, and throwing tiny bead-headed nymphs can be quite rewarding. Nymphs are tiny aquatic insects that are in their busy underwater stages. It is said that over 90 percent of a trout’s diet consists of the little critters. These types of bugs are effective on a year-round basis. But especially here in the Winter. Despite their small size, trout focus on these insects because of their abundance.

Again, I am simply a bug chucking novice. I have only been at this since COVID. I still have a long way to go, but I am starting to understand it. My basic nymph setup consists of a 9-foot leader, and I add another 12 to 18 inches of tippet. At the very end, I tie my nymph. Some folks will add another section to the bend of the hook, but I normally stick with one bug. A split shot is added when needed.

The amount of weight I use will vary. A lot depends on the speed and depth of the water. The key here is to use enough weight to have your nymph bouncing along the bottom. Trout are now extremely sluggish, and they don’t need to work as hard. My placement of the strike indicator also depends, but as a general rule of thumb, it should be at one and a half times the depth. Always be sure that your presentation moves with the flow of the current. Your nymph should drift naturally.

Pay close attention to your elements. The water is now crystal clear, and the fish will spook easy. Patience is so important. Throw a few casts upstream to practice. Think slow. Watch that indicator and focus on what happens. You should be able to tell the difference between a strike and brushing the bottom. When you see a sudden twitch or pause, simply raise your rod. Again. There is no need to set the hook like Jimmy Houston. This obviously takes time to master. It only requires a slight tug. Don’t get too excited and stay focused. This is much easier said than done. It will get better. Trust me.

The Delayed Harvest section near Powy’s Curve is my personal favorite. I am up there all of the time. My lovely bride continues to call me a moron for heading out in the extreme. I don’t mind the cold. I had to get out. Fishing is my zen. And a few drifts is all that I need to recharge my batteries. I might go ice fishing soon. Cheers.