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Webb Weekly is a family-oriented newspaper direct mailed to over 58,000 homes each week.

Webb Weekly

280 Kane St. STE #2
South Williamsport, PA
United States

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Phone: 570-326-9322
Fax: 570-326-9383

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Memorial Day

Memorial Day is often considered the unofficial kick-off to summer. With that, we are once again kicking off our summer giveaway! We are once again doing our Great American Cookout giveaway! We have a grill courtesy of Elery Nau Hardware and gift cards to Rupert’s Specialty Meats and Frosty Beverage! That’s everything you need to

Memorial Day is often considered the unofficial kick-off to summer. With that, we are once again kicking off our summer giveaway! We are once again doing our Great American Cookout giveaway! We have a grill courtesy of Elery Nau Hardware and gift cards to Rupert’s Specialty Meats and Frosty Beverage! That’s everything you need to start the summer grilling season out right! The entry form is right below, just fill it out and mail it in, or drop it off at our office! We need to have your entry by June 17th, and the winner will be announced in the June 29th edition so the winner can enjoy their prize over the 4th of July weekend!

We are also using this kick-off to summer to bring you our Summer Fun and Savings Special Section! You can check that out on pages 51-61!

While Memorial Day is a long weekend to start summer, let’s not forget that Memorial Day is meant to honor those who have made the ultimate sacrifice in defense of our country.

Three years after the Civil War ended, on May 5, 1868, the head of an organization of Union veterans — the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) — established Decoration Day as a time for the nation to decorate the graves of the war dead with flowers. Maj. Gen. John A. Logan declared that Decoration Day should be observed on May 30. It is believed that the date was chosen because flowers would be in bloom all over the country.

As you enjoy your long weekend, take some time to give thanks to those who gave their lives, so you have the freedom to BBQ and enjoy time with your friends and family.

Please take extra time to say a prayer for the families of the soldiers that have given their lives for our freedom since last Memorial Day.

As we celebrate Memorial Day and honor those who have made the ultimate sacrifice for our country, I want to bring up something else that somewhat relates.

We recently received an email from Connie G. Connie asked that we discuss and remind people about proper flag disposal. It got me to thinking, that I really don’t know how to properly dispose of a flag, so as I often do, I went searching for the information. Here’s what I found.

According to defense.gov, “Many state and county government offices and Veterans of Foreign Wars posts have flag disposal boxes outside of their buildings. Police stations also collect them. Once the disposal boxes are full, various organizations such as American Legions, VFWs and the Girl Scouts and Boy Scouts collect the flags and hold flag retirement ceremonies.”

The American Legion passed a resolution about flag retirement ceremonies in 1937, and they’ve been an important ritual ever since. According to the resolution, “The approved method of disposing of unserviceable flags has long been that they be destroyed by burning.”

The U.S. flag is considered such a sacred symbol that burning it in an undignified manner constitutes desecration. That’s why the ceremonies are held in a specific manner.

During an American Legion ceremony, participants stand aligned in two parallel rows about 20 feet apart, facing each other. A small fire burns beyond the rows of members, opposite the Legion commander. 

The flags that are no longer serviceable are presented to Legion commanders, who inspect them to make sure they should, in fact, be discarded. When it’s agreed upon that they’ve reached their current worn state due to proper service of tribute, memory and love, a color guard presents the colors, and a chaplain offers prayers. 

As the crowd salutes, the flag detail dips the retired flags into kerosene and puts them on a rack over the fire. A bugler sounds “To the Colors.”

The National Flag Foundation notes that you don’t have to go all out to properly burn a flag for disposal though. You can take care of it at home.

“Before conducting a flag burning ceremony, note the material of your flag and the local fire ordinances. Some materials may emit toxins if openly burned.

“Begin a flag burning ceremony by folding the whole flag in its customary manner.

“Next, start a fire large enough to completely burn the flag and respectfully place the flag into the fire. The flag should not touch the ground in the process.

“As the flag begins to burn, salute the flag, say the Pledge of Allegiance, and pause for a moment of silence. The flag should be thoroughly burned so that nothing besides ashes are left. Finally, bury the ashes.”

I feel it’s worth mentioning again. If you choose to burn your flag at home, please use extreme caution. I don’t want you setting your house, neighborhood, or backyard forest on fire. If you aren’t sure you can do it safely at home, please drop it in a local flag disposal box. You can also bury (in an appropriate box) or recycle your worn flags. There are also several American Legions and VFWs locally that have flag disposal boxes.

Speaking of safety, please be safe this Memorial Day weekend. Long weekends don’t always bring out the best judgement in people. If you drink, don’t drive. Uber, Lyft, or find yourself a DD. The safety of yourself and those around you aren’t worth risking driving drunk.